Africa in the Global Security Agenda

Global security issues are discussed in United Nations Security Council (UNSC) formal meetings, corridor consultations, and in specific world forums pertaining to their thematic dimensions (climate change; economic crisis; environmental crisis; food crisis; energy crisis; proliferation of nuclear, biologic and or atomic weapons; etc.). In some of these global security frameworks and meetings, Africa is perceived as a ground of threats to global security, poverty, corruption, HIV/AIDS, migration, and other concerns.

An African voice is yet to be fully part of such discussions because of a number of factors (political, economic, military, technological, etc.) that undermine the continent’s role on the global chessboard. In some cases, decisions or resolutions are made without genuine consultation with African stakeholders and incorporating the African position. Moreover, African countries are not always able to come up with strong common positions in critical meetings that make such decisions.

This occurs not only for global security issues that also affect the African continent, but also when it comes to foreign actors’ agendas in Africa and on African security. There is strong need for Africa to consistently develop its common positions towards foreign agendas on its own security.

Africa is increasingly intertwined with the global security system. Key topics of concern to both African and global actors are terrorism, violent political extremism, piracy, trafficking of drugs and people, money laundering, and – more generally – the stability of African states as well as the effective governance of security they can provide. Global security actors increasingly involve themselves on the continent, through UN-mandated peace support operations as well as military cooperation with selected African partners. At the same time, Africa strives to take charge of its destiny in matters of peace and security, guided by a common vision for its future and based on the African Peace and Security Architecture as its home grown framework. In order to better exploit the potential for collaboration between African and global actors, a number of challenges need to be addressed: How can an African voice be formed, and where will it be heard? How can Africa claim full leadership for initiatives on its soil? How can a more effective exchange of information and idea be assured? When the world needs Africa, on whom may it call?

These challenges call for increased dialogue among African leaders, as well as between them and their international counterparts. The context is also favourable for such a dialogue. The Tana Forum in 2016 is expected to address these key issues affecting the relationships of Africa with the rest of the world on the global security agenda.

Global security issues are discussed in United Nations Security Council (UNSC) formal meetings, corridor consultations, and in specific world forums pertaining to their thematic dimensions (climate change; economic crisis; environmental crisis; food crisis; energy crisis; proliferation of nuclear, biologic and or atomic weapons; etc.). In some of these global security frameworks and meetings, Africa is perceived as a ground of threats to global security, poverty, corruption, HIV/AIDS, migration, and other concerns.

An African voice is yet to be fully part of such discussions because of a number of factors (political, economic, military, technological, etc.) that undermine the continent’s role on the global chessboard. In some cases, decisions or resolutions are made without genuine consultation with African stakeholders and incorporating the African position. Moreover, African countries are not always able to come up with strong common positions in critical meetings that make such decisions.

This occurs not only for global security issues that also affect the African continent, but also when it comes to foreign actors’ agendas in Africa and on African security. There is strong need for Africa to consistently develop its common positions towards foreign agendas on its own security.

Africa is increasingly intertwined with the global security system. Key topics of concern to both African and global actors are terrorism, violent political extremism, piracy, trafficking of drugs and people, money laundering, and – more generally – the stability of African states as well as the effective governance of security they can provide. Global security actors increasingly involve themselves on the continent, through UN-mandated peace support operations as well as military cooperation with selected African partners. At the same time, Africa strives to take charge of its destiny in matters of peace and security, guided by a common vision for its future and based on the African Peace and Security Architecture as its home grown framework. In order to better exploit the potential for collaboration between African and global actors, a number of challenges need to be addressed: How can an African voice be formed, and where will it be heard? How can Africa claim full leadership for initiatives on its soil? How can a more effective exchange of information and idea be assured? When the world needs Africa, on whom may it call?

These challenges call for increased dialogue among African leaders, as well as between them and their international counterparts. The context is also favourable for such a dialogue. The Tana Forum in 2016 is expected to address these key issues affecting the relationships of Africa with the rest of the world on the global security agenda.

For the forthcoming edition, the theme is: Africa in the Global Security Agenda. In coming up with this theme, the impetus is to grasp the reasons why Africa’s security challenges are attracting substantial global attention whereas the continent’s own experience and articulation of the issues has yet to obtain commensurate global significance. It is evident today, more than any time in the past, that Africa needs to rally a unified and amplified voice—and agency—if it is to assert its own interests in international security debates. Once again, Tana 2016 will afford African Heads of State and Governments, high-level government officials, notable African personalities, academics, third sector leaders as well as a spectrum of international actors, another opportune space to discuss Africa’s role and responsibility within the international security arena.

The choice of the theme is timely and appropriate, especially now that Africa is at the receiving end of a variety of security experiments; a variety of security doctrines pushed by key state and non-state actors are all supposedly aspiring for home grown solutions. Africa not only suffers acute security problems but is also at the forefront of pioneering innovative security responses. The continent’s myriad security concerns are triggering global ripples; from conflict over resources to mass distress migration, from hybrid internal-international conflicts to the challenges of multilateral peace support operations, to name a few.

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Infographic on Africa in the Global Security Agenda the theme (PDF).

Tana 2016 Programme

The 5th Tana High-Level Forum on Security in Africa

Programme

“Africa in the Global Security Agenda”

16-17 April 2016

Venue: Blue Nile Resort

Click here to download the document (pdf)

 

2016 Programme Chair:

H.E. Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus

Minister of Foreign Affairs, Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia

Member of the Tana Forum Board

 

Chief Rapporteur:           

Prof. Charles Ukeje

Senior Advisor, Africa Peace and Security Programme (APSP)

Institute for Peace and Security Studies (IPSS), Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

 

TIME:  FRIDAY, 15 APRIL 2016

9.00 – 18.00        Arrival of participants and registration at the Grand Hotel

17.00 – 18.30     Pre-forum event (in collaboration with Bahir Dar University)

 

Chair: H.E. Mr. Joaquim Chissano, Former President of the Republic of Mozambique

Public lecture on: “The Developmental State in Africa: The Rwandan Experience”

 Speaker: H.E. Ms. Louise Mushikiwabo, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation, Republic of Rwanda;

 

Remarks by:

  •  Prof. Andreas Eshete, Special Advisor to the Prime Minister of Ethiopia and Deputy Chairperson of the Tana Forum Boar 
  • Prof. Adebayo Olukoshi, Executive Director, Africa and the Middle East, IDEA International

19.30 – 21.30      Welcome reception at Blue Nile

SATURDAY, 16 APRIL 2016

08.00 – 10.30      Arrival of participants and registration at the Grand Hotel

10.45 – 12.30      Special Event: The 2016 Annual Meles Zenawi Lecture Series

“Leadership in Africa: Reflections on the Legacy of Patrice Lumumba”

Chair: Dr. Monde Muyangwa, Director, Africa Program, Woodrow Wilson Center, USA

 

Speaker:

  • Prof. Elikia M’Bokolo, Director, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, France

 12.30 – 13.30      Lunch

13.45– 15.30                       OPENING SESSION

 

Chair: H.E. Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus

Minister of Foreign Affairs, Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia

Member of the Tana Forum Board

 

14.00 – 14.10      Introductory Video: “Tana Forum 5 years later”

14.10 – 14.30      Welcome Address by H.E. Mr. Hailemariam Desalegn, Prime Minister of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia and Host of the Tana Forum

14.30 – 14.45      Tana Forum 5th year anniversary: “The Spirit of Tana” By Prof. Andreas Eshete, Special Advisor to the Prime Minister of Ethiopia and Deputy Chairperson of the Tana Forum Board

14.45 – 15.10     “The State of Peace and Security in Africa 2016” by H.E. Mr. Olusegun Obasanjo, Former President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria and Chairperson of the Tana Forum Board

15.10 – 15.35                      Break

15.40 – 17.45                      SESSION I: “Africa’s Role in the International Security Realm”

Keynote address by Mr. Kofi Annan, Chairman of the Kofi Annan Foundation, Former Secretary General of the United Nations and Nobel Prize Laureate

Chair: H.E. Mr. Thabo Mbeki, President of the Thabo Mbeki Foundation and Former President of South Africa

Format: Keynote address followed by discussants’ inputs and debates

15.40 – 16.10                      Keynote Address

16.10 – 17.00      Discussants: 

  •  Dr. Carlos Lopes, Under-Secretary General and Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic   Commission for Africa (UNECA);
  •  Amb. Wolfgang Ischinger, Chairperson of the Munich Security Conference, Germany;
  •  H.E. Ms. Louise Mushikiwabo, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation, Republic of Rwanda;
  •  Prof. Adebayo Olukoshi, Executive Director, Africa and the Middle East, IDEA International

 

17.00 – 17.45 Discussions

 

17.45 – 18.00      Summary of day one and setting the stage for day two by Dr. Charles Ukeje, 2016 Chief Rapporteur

18.00                     End of day one

18.00 – 19.30      Networking, Bi-laterals, Media Interviews

18.00 – 19.30      HIGH LEVEL CONSULTATION:

“The African Union and its leadership towards 2063”

Chair: H.E. Mr. Hailemariam Desalegn, Prime Minister of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia and Host of the Tana Forum (by invitation only)

19.30 – 22.00                      5th Anniversary Gala Dinner hosted by the Amhara Regional Government

  SUNDAY, 17 APRIL 2016

07.30 – 8.30        Networking Breakfast

 

08.00 – 8.30        Tree planting at the Tana Forum Park by Heads of State/Government  

 

08.30 – 9.30         HEADS OF STATE PANEL

 

Chair: Dr. Eleni Gabre-Madhin, CEO, Eleni LLC

09.35 – 11.10      SESSION II: “Peace Support Operations in Africa: New Paradigms, new Models’’

 

Chair: H.E. Mr. Jose Ramos-Horta, Nobel Prize Laureate, Former President of Timor-Leste, and Chair of the High-Level Independent Panel on United Nations Peace Operations

 

09.35 – 10.15     Format: Panel Discussion with an introductory video on peacekeeping in Africa

 

Panellists:

  • H.E. Mr. Pierre Buyoya, Special Representative of the AU; Chairperson/Head of the African–led International Support Mission in Mali (AFISMA), Former President of Burundi, and Member of the Tana Forum Board;
  •  General Martin Agwai, Former Deputy Force Commander of the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone and Force Commander of the African Union – United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur
  •  General Babacar Gaye, Former Special Representative and Head of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA) and (MONUC) in DRC;
  •  Dr. Cedric de Coning, Senior Research Fellow, Peace and Conflict Research Group, NUPI, Norway, and Member of the Tana Forum Technical Committee.

 

10.15 – 11.00      Q&A Session with Plenary

 

11.00 – 11.10      Break (in meeting room)

11.10 – 12.15                      SESSION III: “Conflict Prevention, Building Peace Infrastructures, and Sustaining Peace”

 

Chair: Amb. Fatuma Ndangiza, Former Chairperson of the APR Panel of Eminent Persons

11.10 – 11.40  Format: Panel Discussion

Panellists:

  •  Mr. Jean-Marie Guehenno, President, International Crisis Group, Belgium;
  • Dr. Nkosana Moyo, Executive Chairman of the Mandela Institute for Development Studies (MINDS), South Africa;
  • Amb. Amedou Ould Abdallah, President of Centre for Strategy and Security; Member of the 2016 UN Peacebuilding Panel, Mauritania;
  • Mr. Sekou Toure Otondi, University of Nairobi, Winner of the Tana Forum Annual African Universities’ Essay Competition.

11.40 – 12.15      Q&A Session with Plenary

12.20 – 13.30     CLOSING CEREMONY

Chair: Ms. Betty Bigombe, Senior Director for Fragility, Conflict and Violence, the World Bank, USA and Former Minister for Water Management, Uganda

12.20 – 12.40 Reflections on the Forum:

  • Amb. Ismaïl Chergui, Commissioner for Peace and Security, African Union Commission;
  • Amb. Susan Page, U.S. Chargé d’Affaires to the African Union

12.50 – 13.05      Remarks and vote of thanks  by H.E. Mr. Olusegun Obasanjo, Former President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria and Chairperson of the Tana Forum Board

13.05 – 13.20      Tana Forum: the way forward and closing remarks by H.E. Mr. Hailemariam Desalegn, Prime Minister of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia and Host of the Tana Forum

13.30                     End of the 5th Tana Forum and lunch

14.30     Press Conference – Tana Forum Board

17.00                     Departure to Addis Ababa

Tana 2016 in the Media

Tana 2016 Discussion Papers

Organised Crime and Security in Africa

Tana 2013

The discussion paper articulates that the underlining concern during instability and conflict on the continent is the space they create for organized crimes, including but not limited to, human trafficking, trade of illegal drugs, weapons’ sales, sexual slavery, organ harvesting, piracy, and illegal natural resource mining. It further probes in to concrete examples wherein organized crimes are evident in the continent and discusses the way forward.

Tana 2016 Speeches

Annexture to President Thabo Mbeki’s Keynote Address at the 2nd Session of the Tana High- Level Forum, on “Security and Organised Crime in Africa”

Tana 2013

In his speech Thabo Mbeki, former President of South Africa notes ‘within our attempts to address some of the Continent‟s most pressing security challenges, we must continuously interrogate the inherent complexities in the world around us. It will be impossible for us to forge a more secure Africa with- out first examining the diverse and converging forces that will impact on what we do today’.

Statement by Hassan Sheikh Mohamud, President of the Federal Government of Somalia

Tana 2013

H.E. Hassan Sheikh says that Africa needs strong commitment from its leaders and people to stand together to combat any sort of illegal activities, including the drugs and human trafficking, illegal arms trade, illegal fishing and maritime piracy, toxic waste dumping, money laundering and any other organized crime in Africa. He notes that Somalia experiences daily instances of criminality, to the vulnerable people,and abiding citizens losing their confidences and trust to the institutions. He furhter adds that the challenge Somalia is phasing is simultaneously building effective security institutions in one hand and fighting organized crimes on the other hand. He proposes that Africa is waiting us to fully address and discuss these issues in very frank and concerted way. To combat all sorts of transnational organized crimes, there is a need to work out a strategy from the local to the global level. 

Speech by Omar Al-Bashir, President of the Republic of Sudan

Tana 2013

H.E. Al-Bashir in the speech says that there is a nexus between internal armed conflicts and organized crime, this nexus is like a vicious and evil circle composed of many factors all of which are fueling the inferno of crisis. He adds that poverty and unemployment are the root causes of committing crime and the reason why young people take risks in their attempts to migrate. Morever the right to development and the right to employment should be given priority along with other rights. The unfair sanctions and the extended debt prove to be tools to deepen the misery of the people rather than a punishment against governments.

Welcome Address by Olusegun Obasanjo, Chairperson of the Tana Forum

Tana 2013

In his welcoming address H.E. Olesugen Obasanjo, notes that the African continent has gone through diffenret serious peace and security challenges after Tana 2012. In this regard he cites that the Arab spring, the boarder dispute between Sudan and South Sudan and the aggravating situations in Mali and Central African Republic. Moreover he adds that organized crime is also among the challenges the continent faces in the 21st Century. The differnet reflections of organized crime destzblizes social fabrics, foster insecurity and brings about huamn tragedy are causing the continent serious security problems.

Welcome Address by Olusegun Obasanjo, Chairperson of the Tana Forum

Tana 2013

In his welcoming address H.E. Olesugen Obasanjo, notes that the African continent has gone through diffenret serious peace and security challenges after Tana 2012. In this regard he cites that the Arab spring, the boarder dispute between Sudan and South Sudan and the aggravating situations in Mali and Central African Republic. Moreover he adds that organized crime is also among the challenges the continent faces in the 21st Century. The differnet reflections of organized crime destzblizes social fabrics, foster insecurity and brings about huamn tragedy are causing the continent serious security problems.

Opening Remarks by Hailemariam Desalegn, Prime Minister of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia (FDRE)

Tana 2013

In his opening speech, Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn after welcoming the participants notes that the Tana High Level Forum is intended to serve as a forum that provides opportunities for African leaders and other stakeholders – private and public alike – to exchange experiences and insights of peace and security issues among themselves – and draw practical lessons that they will adapt to their respective environments. He also congragulates the Tana leadership for a job well done.

Tana 2016 Discussion Papers

Report of the 2nd Tana High-Level Forum on Security in Africa

Tana 2013 Report

The report contains specehs from H.E. Hailemariam Desalegn, Prime Minister of the Federal Republic of Ethiopia, H.E Olusegun Obasajo, Former President of Nigeria and Tana Board Chairperson, H.E. Sheikh Mohamud, President of Somalia and H.E. Omar al-Bashir, President of Sudan. The report also contains speeches by H.E. Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda and Prof. Andreas Eshete, Tana Board Deputy Chairperson and Adviser to the Prime Minister with a rank of a minister, forwarding tributes to the late prime minister of Ethiopia, Meles Zenawi. Moreover Key note adresses, discussion papers and photos from the event are also included.